Tag Archives: marinade

Leftover turkey pot pie with Stubb’s Chicken Rub and Marinade

Leftover turkey pot pie with Stubb’s Chicken Rub and Marinade

Stubbs Turkey Pot Pie 3After Thanksgiving Day or Christmas, you’ll probably have leftovers coming out of your ears, namely turkey. If you become tired of eating it plain or simply topped with gravy, then try it out in something else. Read the remixed turkey dish ideas below and scroll down further for some full recipes using leftover turkey that have been kicked up with Stubb’s Bar-B-Q sauces and rubs.

The obvious go-to with excess turkey is to eat it between two slices of bread — slathered with cranberry sauce and/or gravy is great, but it’s also amazing smothered in barbecue sauce in between two slices of Texas toast. Another option is to build it and press it: make it a melt, panini, or even in a tortilla, dressed up as a quesadilla.

Another option is to tuck the turkey into a heartwarming casserole or pot pie. Mix it up with some canned condensed soup mix or a cream sauce and serve on top of pasta or bake it as a casserole; or omit the noodles and place it in a baking dish topped with biscuit dough.
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Asian Style Noodles with Roast Pork and Peanut Sauce

Asian Style Noodles with Roast Pork and Peanut Sauce

Stubbs Noodles sm text

Tired of takeout or bland freezer food for those busy weeknight dinners? Here’s a quick, easy and exotic meal idea that’s a breeze to prepare and sure to please everyone at your dinner table.

For this Asian-inspired dish, I used Stubb’s Pork Marinade as the base for marinating a pork tenderloin. The flavors of lemongrass, chilies, and lime in Stubb’s Pork Marinade make the perfect flavor base for an Asian-style dish. With the addition of a little extra garlic, ginger and fresh lime juice, I marinated pork tenderloin for a few hours, then seared and roasted it to give it a nice browned crust. Noodles in a zesty peanut sauce make a great accompaniment to the pork and can be quickly whipped up while the pork is cooking.

Besides the marinating time, this meal can be prepared and on the table in about thirty minutes or less. Better yet, you may already have some of the ingredients on-hand, like peanut butter and soy sauce, and the rest of the ingredients can be easily found at your grocery store. Don’t have any Asian noodles? No problem. Standard spaghetti or fettuccine pasta make great substitutions. And if peanuts pose an allergy issue, simply substitute almond butter and almonds for the peanut products.

Try these Asian-style noodles with roast pork tenderloin and peanut sauce tonight and you may never have to dig out those takeout menus again.

Check out the recipe on Stubb’s Legendary Bar-B-Q’s website!

Bacon-wrapped chicken with sage

Bacon-wrapped chicken with sage

Bacon Sage Chicken

Here’s a twist on the classic chicken/veal/beef “saltimbocca” that replaces the Italian prosciutto with bacon. I also added an extra kick of flavor using Stubb’s Texas Butter Injectable Marinade before wrapping and cooking the chicken. It’s as easy as inject, wrap, sear in a pan and finish baking in the oven. The marinade is optional, but I recommend giving it a try as it adds flavor to the inside of the chicken breasts and help ensure that they don’t dry out when cooked.

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Love at First Bite: Pan seared New York strip with red wine jus

Love at First Bite: Pan seared New York strip with red wine jus
VDay steak sm logo

Simple, sexy and divinely delicious!

To many folks, the thought of a Valentine’s Day meal conjures up images of a sumptuous steak dinner. Believe it or not, achieving a perfectly cooked steak with complementary pan sauce in the comfort of your own home is easier than you might think.

To jazz up the typical steak and sauce duo you’d find at a steakhouse, I used a few secret ingredients (which aren’t so secret anymore): steak rub and marinade by Stubb’s Bar-B-Q. Giving the steak a rub down with the Stubb’s Beef Spice Rub (pun intended) gives it a great crust when it’s seared and the spices add a nice pop of flavor. For the red wine jus, whip up a simple pan sauce in the same pan that the steak was seared in. Cook the leftover drippings from the seared with a bold red wine. Enhance the sauce further by adding Stubb’s Beef Marinade. You can certainly play with different steak rub and marinade pairings for this recipe (or with other proteins), just make sure the flavors pair well together. My advice? Taste the products by themselves and then together. Also look for similar ingredients in your rub and marinade.

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Savory makeover for a Thanksgiving classic: Sweet Potato and Smoked Gouda Gratin (with a secret ingredient)

Savory makeover for a Thanksgiving classic: Sweet Potato and Smoked Gouda Gratin (with a secret ingredient)

Cheesy, smoky, creamy and downright delicious!

Many people associate sweet potatoes as a sugar-sweet side dish for Thanksgiving — swimming in butter and brown sugar, and topped with marshmallows. While this classic dish is fantastic, I decided to give it a savory makeover this year with the help of a secret ingredient.

Instead of boiling and mashing the sweet potatoes, I went for a twist on the classic baked gratin dish. I thinly sliced the raw sweet potatoes into 1/8″ thick rounds (a mandoline would make this job even easier) and layered them in a baking dish, scattering grated smoked Gouda cheese in between each layer (ending up with three layers of potatoes). For a typical gratin, cream is poured over the layered potatoes before baking. To spice this up a bit, I added chopped garlic and Stubb’s Pork Marinade — which contains spices garlic, lemongrass and ginger — to the cream.

The result: a tasty casserole that’s cheesy, smoky, creamy, slightly spiced and with a hint of sweetness from the sweet potatoes. After tasting this, I may never go the typical brown sugar and marshmallow route for Thanksgiving again.
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Everyday exotic: Korean Barbecue Beef and Rice Bowl with Bok Choy

Everyday exotic: Korean Barbecue Beef and Rice Bowl with Bok Choy

Being that I’m always experimenting with food, I’ve been on a Korean kick lately. Korea’s food obviously has some similar elements to Chinese and Japanese dishes, but as a whole it’s nowhere near the same. Japanese food seems to be more on the minimalist side of things — with simple, clean flavors — while Chinese cooking (in most regions) uses many ingredients and flavors. Korean cooking lies somewhere in the middle.

Korean cuisine is based on vegetables, meat and rice, and often includes garlic, ginger, pepper flakes, sesame oil, black pepper, vinegars, doenjang (fermented bean paste) and gochujang (fermented red chili paste) — yielding an array of tangy, savory and sometimes spicy dishes.

For my experiment, I took inspiration from two popular Korean dishes: bulgogi and bibimbap. Bulgogi is traditionally thinly sliced beef sirloin that has been marinated in a mixture of soy sauce, sugar, sesame oil, garlic and other ingredients. It is then quickly grilled or stir-fried and served with lettuce (to wrap the meat in) and a dipping sauce.

Bibimbap is a staple of Korean cooking comprised of a bowl filled with rice and topped with meat, usually beef, gochujang, varying combinations of vegetables and a fried egg. The contents in the bowl are typically mixed together while being eaten, which is very fitting as the word bibimbap in Korean literally translates to “mixed meal.”

Put the two dishes together and you get this Korean barbecue beef and rice bowl with bok choy. (See recipe below.) I didn’t have any gochujang on hand, so I substituted red pepper flakes in the marinade. As for the beef, I used the flat iron cut, which is a thinner piece of meat cut from the shoulder section, similar to skirt or flank steak. Flat iron, or “top blade,” steak is a tender, flavorful and inexpensive cut that takes well to marinating and should be cooked quickly over fairly high heat. Don’t go much past medium or it will become tough.


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