Tag Archives: dinner

Love at First Bite: Pan seared New York strip with red wine jus

Love at First Bite: Pan seared New York strip with red wine jus
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Simple, sexy and divinely delicious!

To many folks, the thought of a Valentine’s Day meal conjures up images of a sumptuous steak dinner. Believe it or not, achieving a perfectly cooked steak with complementary pan sauce in the comfort of your own home is easier than you might think.

To jazz up the typical steak and sauce duo you’d find at a steakhouse, I used a few secret ingredients (which aren’t so secret anymore): steak rub and marinade by Stubb’s Bar-B-Q. Giving the steak a rub down with the Stubb’s Beef Spice Rub (pun intended) gives it a great crust when it’s seared and the spices add a nice pop of flavor. For the red wine jus, whip up a simple pan sauce in the same pan that the steak was seared in. Cook the leftover drippings from the seared with a bold red wine. Enhance the sauce further by adding Stubb’s Beef Marinade. You can certainly play with different steak rub and marinade pairings for this recipe (or with other proteins), just make sure the flavors pair well together. My advice? Taste the products by themselves and then together. Also look for similar ingredients in your rub and marinade.

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You say tomato, I say soup: Creamy Sherried Tomato Soup with Herbs

You say tomato, I say soup: Creamy Sherried Tomato Soup with Herbs

This easy-to-prepare tomato soup is comforting goodness in a bowl.

No matter the weather or season, any time is a great time for tomato soup. There’s something comforting and restorative about a warm bowl of tomato soup — homemade tomato soup, that is. For me, it’s one of life’s simple pleasures. This version in particular is so easy to prepare that you’ll be on your way to culinary bliss in no time.

When I first found this recipe and saw some of the main ingredients — tomato juice and chicken base — I worried that it would turn out tasting like something grandma would made or simply like I’d opened a can of Campbell’s (which is decent, but like I said, homemade simply tastes better). Turns out the ingredients totally work — the juice gives it added tomatoey oomph and the chicken base is a shortcut to using broth, which one would have to simmer for ages to achieve the same flavor.

The result is a pinkish-hued bowl of comfort to be served warm or piping hot (depending on your mood and the weather outside). I like to stir in chopped herbs like parsley and basil just before serving for a pop of color and flavor. As for the sherry, Ree used cooking sherry, whereas I prefer to use real sherry wine.

Sherry is a fortified wine that originates in Jerez (“Sherish”), Spain, and is typically served as an an aperitif used to “finish” and add flavor to dishes. I go by the old adage on cooking with booze: “If you wouldn’t drink it, don’t cook with it.” Cooking sherry is a version of sherry which has been treated with salts and other additives so that it can be stored in the cupboard at room temperature. While this is all well and good, I’m not a fan of its flavor and prefer using standard dry (not sweet) sherry wine in its place. Don’t have sherry on hand? Not a problem. Try substituting a cup of dry red or white wine for the sherry — just add it before you throw in the tomatoes to let the flavors meld while they’re simmering together — or leave it out altogether.

Feel free to get a little creative with this recipe and personalize it as well. For added flavor, try throwing in a teaspoon or two of fresh, chopped rosemary or thyme when sweating the onions. Don’t want to use the cream and/or sherry? Not a problem. Try substituting a cup of dry red or white wine for the sherry; just add it before you throw in the tomatoes to let their flavors meld while they’re simmering together.

Not only is this tomato soup approachable for any cooking skill level, it’s perfect for a weeknight meal, as it only takes minutes to throw together and you can get it on the table in a flash. Serve it alongside a gooey grilled cheese sandwich and call it dinner.
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Tapas at Home: Spanish stewed chickpeas with chorizo

Tapas at Home: Spanish stewed chickpeas with chorizo

Tapas (or “small plates”) have been a popular restaurant trend for quite some time now; the fad of ordering multiple small plates filled with smoky chorizo, spicy tomato sauce and garlicky shellfish (to name a few) for sharing with tablemates is still going strong. Plus, they’re a great way to try an array of dishes without having to order huge portions that will just end up in a doggy bag.

Here’s a novel idea: You don’t need to venture out to enjoy these dishes, as many of them are pretty darn simple to whip up at home. The ingredients are easy to find at your local grocery store and you may even have most of them in your pantry.

Here is an amazingly simple and exotic tapas dish to get you started on your culinary tour of Spain: stewed chickpeas with chorizo, aka “habas con chorizo.” Smoky and slightly spicy cured Spanish chorizo rendered and sauteed with onions and garlic, then simmered with cinnamon, cloves and broth until the liquid and aromatics have reduced and are absorbed by the chickpeas. Sounds complex but, trust me, it’s pretty foolproof and 100 percent delicious.

The key to getting the liquid to reduce is all in the pan. A large sauté pan with sloping sides will allow steam to be released, thus aiding in the liquid reduction process. A pan or pot with high, straight sides will keep more of the liquid vapor trapped inside the vessel and it will take the liquid twice as long to reduce; only choose this type of pot or pan if you’re making a soup or stew.

This dish hails from Catalonia, located in the northeastern region of Spain’s Mediterranean coast. Catalan dishes rely heavily on ingredients used in Mediterranean cuisine — tomato, garlic, olive oil, legumes, eggplant, etc. One legume, the garbanzo bean (or “chickpea”), is used often in Mediterranean dishes either whole in salads or stews, or mashed up to make hummus or falafel. Pork products are widely used in Catalonia — since they’re the main producers of pork products in Spain — and cured chorizo (a hallmark of Spanish cuisine) is often used to flavor soups, stews and a range of other dishes. Put chickpeas and chorizo together and you’ve got a hearty, smoky dish that’s adaptable for any occasion (save for Jewish or Muslim holidays).
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