Tag Archives: bake

Leftover turkey pot pie with Stubb’s Chicken Rub and Marinade

Leftover turkey pot pie with Stubb’s Chicken Rub and Marinade

Stubbs Turkey Pot Pie 3After Thanksgiving Day or Christmas, you’ll probably have leftovers coming out of your ears, namely turkey. If you become tired of eating it plain or simply topped with gravy, then try it out in something else. Read the remixed turkey dish ideas below and scroll down further for some full recipes using leftover turkey that have been kicked up with Stubb’s Bar-B-Q sauces and rubs.

The obvious go-to with excess turkey is to eat it between two slices of bread — slathered with cranberry sauce and/or gravy is great, but it’s also amazing smothered in barbecue sauce in between two slices of Texas toast. Another option is to build it and press it: make it a melt, panini, or even in a tortilla, dressed up as a quesadilla.

Another option is to tuck the turkey into a heartwarming casserole or pot pie. Mix it up with some canned condensed soup mix or a cream sauce and serve on top of pasta or bake it as a casserole; or omit the noodles and place it in a baking dish topped with biscuit dough.
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One-pan Smokehouse Bourbon roast chicken thighs and vegetables

One-pan Smokehouse Bourbon roast chicken thighs and vegetables

Stubbs One Pan Chx 3

There are some nights when most of us have a hankering to cook dinner for family or friends, wanting to make something savory and satisfying, but then we realize that making dinner also means dealing with dirty dishes afterward. If you’re anything like me, this is certainly a buzz kill. I enjoy making healthful and tasty dinners, but loathe the thought of having to scrub all of those pots pans directly following the meal. That’s why I adore one-pan meals: all ingredients are cooked (and sometimes even served in) the same pan. That means just one pan to clean.

Here’s a great option for an easy week night or weekend meal to share with your loved ones: one-pan roasted chicken thighs with onions, carrots, potatoes, and peas. While great on its own, I decided to kick up the flavor by using Stubb’s Smokehouse Bourbon Cookin’ Sauce Pack. I seasoned the chicken thighs with the Spice Pack, which is full of sea salt, garlic, ancho chile, before searing them, then simmered the chicken and vegetables in the smoky and savory Smokehouse Bourbon Sauce before placing the whole pan in the oven to finish cooking.
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Hatch green chiles in dessert! Peach and Hatch Chile Cobbler

Hatch green chiles in dessert! Peach and Hatch Chile Cobbler

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It’s finally Hatch chile season again here in Texas and the Southwest. These chilies are probably more popular in this state than in their home state of New Mexico, seeing as they’re used in just about every edible form imaginable in restaurants and grocery stores during the late summertime.

The only food category that’s usually lacking in these smoky, spicy chilies is dessert. I’m a huge proponent of using items that are typically attributed to savory dishes in sweets, so I thought, “why not use Hatch chilies in dessert form?” I chose another fabulous seasonal piece of produce to accompany these chilies in my creation: peaches. Their honeyed sweetness perfectly complements the spicy and slightly tangy flavor of the chilies, especially when they’re baked up with a simple cake base like a Southern cobbler. To further enhance the Hatch chile taste, I also used a dash of Stubb’s Legendary Bar-B-Q’s Green Chile Marinade. The Hatch chilies, pineapple and lime juices, and brown sugar in the marinade add a sweet and tangy flavor that takes this cobbler to the next level of deliciousness.

Try out this sweet, savory, and smoky peach and hatch chile cobbler for dessert tonight or when entertaining a crowd this summer. It’s incredibly easy to whip up and is great served warm, topped with vanilla ice cream or whipped cream.

Check out the recipe on Stubb’s Legendary Bar-B-Q’s website!

Chicken with Fresh Peas Braised in Sparkling Wine: A simple dish that’s packed full of flavor

Chicken with Fresh Peas Braised in Sparkling Wine: A simple dish that’s packed full of flavor
Marks & Spencer

Image credit: Delish.com

As most of you faithful readers know, I love cooking with booze. Using beer, wine or spirits is a great way to infuse flavor and amp up a dish. Whether it’s used for deglazing in a simple pan sauce or for a low and slow braise, alcohol can add a myraid of flavors to a dish (as long as you’re not using bottom shelf swill).

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Image credit: Marks & Spencer

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Brioche and Sausage Stuffing with Apples, Dried Cherries and Hazelnuts

Brioche and Sausage Stuffing with Apples, Dried Cherries and Hazelnuts
A revamped holiday stuffing sporting an array of awesome flavors

A revamped holiday stuffing sporting an array of awesome flavors

Besides the giant turkey, I bet if you asked most Americans what their favorite Thanksgiving dish is they’d say it’s the stuffing. Being included in that party, it’s only appropriate that my first official holiday-related recipe of the year is a classed up version of this favorite side.

For this revamped stuffing, I wanted to use a variety of tastes: buttery brioche bread, savory sausage, sweet apples, tart dried cherries, and crunchy hazelnuts. The pièce de résistance? Hitting the saute pan with sweet and smoky bourbon to deglaze it and concentrate the flavors of the alcohol.

My pro tip for stuffing: Don’t even think about putting it inside your raw turkey and baking it that way — always bake it separately. Stuffing baked inside turkeys gets soaked with raw turkey juices and almost never reaches the proper internal temperature, thus making it one of the biggest causes of food-borne illness during the holidays.

Stay safe and keep it tasty this Thanksgiving, and be sure to try out this updated take on the best addition to your holiday table.
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Pumpkin and sage give macaroni and cheese an injection of autumn flavors

Pumpkin and sage give macaroni and cheese an injection of autumn flavors

Pumpkin Mac text

Since I’m still on my comfort food kick and totally inspired by the season, I decided to whip up another classic dish and given it an injection of autumn: baked macaroni and cheese with pumpkin and sage. Sure, mac and cheese is great as it is, but you’d be surprised how much better it can be with the addition of pumpkin, giving it the slightest hint of sweetness. Sage is my absolute favorite herb to cook with during the fall and it pairs perfectly with pumpkin, so I figured, why not throw it in this dish, too?

I also wanted to write up this particular recipe to teach you readers a thing or two about classic cooking techniques. I recently featured a recipe here that used the classic “mother sauce” Béchamel — milk thickened with a roux (equal parts fat and flour) to make a white sauce. This one uses the basics for Béchamel but adds cheese to it, thus making it a Mornay sauce (read: fancy name for cheese sauce). See? You can make easy, tasty food and learn some fancy cooking skills along the way.

While you can use just about any cheese you’d like for this recipe, I suggest using a white, mild-flavored cheese, like white cheddar, Gouda, or Gruyere, as it won’t overpower the pumpkin flavor or hide the bright yellow-orange hue imparted by the pumpkin puree. And while this mac and cheese doesn’t need to be baked after the creamy sauce is cooked, popping it in the oven gives it a firmer texture and and crispy exterior.
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One-Pan Roast Chicken with Sausage, Apple, Citrus and Rosemary

One-Pan Roast Chicken with Sausage, Apple, Citrus and Rosemary
Get a taste of fall with this one-pan roast chicken and sausage recipe

Get a taste of fall with this one-pan roast chicken and sausage recipe

It’s funny how the autumnal equinox can make an almost immediate change in the weather — with the overnight switch from summer to fall you can start to smell the faint hint of autumn in the air almost overnight. Maybe it’s all in my head, but I swear the slightest breeze feels just a tad cooler the day after the calendar date of this change of seasons. And with this real or imagined cooler weather comes the itch to crank up my oven and start using the warm and comforting flavors of this time of year. Hearty herbs like rosemary, sage and thyme are hallmarks of fall tastes; citrus, apples and pears are in season, and baking and roasting are the cooking methods that prevail.

For my first recipe of the season, I’m giving plain old chicken an injection of fall flavors with the addition of rosemary, orange and smoked sausage in a one-pan roast. Pan-seared chicken legs and thighs are nestled in a bed of onion, apple, smoked sausage, seasoned with orange zest and fresh rosemary, and then roasted to golden-brown perfection in the oven.

On its own or paired with a few sides, this dish is a savory and flavorsome addition to your autumn recipe repertoire. It’s also very versatile: use lemon in place of the orange, sage or thyme to replace the rosemary, and you can even switch up the smoked sausage and use cured Spanish chorizo in its place.
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Savor summer’s end: Savory heirloom tomato cobbler

Savor summer’s end: Savory heirloom tomato cobbler

Proving that tomatoes can turn a classic dessert into a savory delight.

Even though turning on the oven in the middle of August isn’t on the top of most people’s list, there are a few dishes that are worth the extra mercury on the thermometer. Tomato cobbler is one of them.

“Cobbler? But that’s a dessert!,” is the reaction of most folks. Not in this case. This cobbler is a savory take on the classic sweet dessert and uses fresh and juicy summer tomatoes in place of the fruit (though, technically, tomatoes are also considered to be fruit).

Why tomatoes, you ask? Sure, you could throw them in a nice, cold salad, but have you ever popped them in the oven and baked them until they burst? Their natural sugars are enhanced with the application of heat and roasting them brings out their sweetness and even more flavor over eating them raw. In short, roasted tomatoes are a-mazing. If you have access to heirloom tomatoes, splurge and use them in this dish as they have even more “meat” and flavor to them than most tomatoes in the market.

To make this easy tomato cobbler, the vegetables (or “fruit and veg”) are cooked in a pan and poured into a baking dish over a cornmeal batter. To give it an even more homey and rustic look, use an ovenproof or cast iron pan to cook, bake and serve it in. And if you get the hankering for this savory side dish and tomatoes aren’t in season, simply use drained, canned tomatoes (the no-salt added kind). It tastes great when served fresh out of the oven, but tastes even more heavenly if it is allowed to sit and cool a little while and served at room temperature. It also makes fantastic leftovers when reheated and served the following day.

Grab the sumptuous flavors of late summer while you still can, crank up that oven, and make this mouthwatering cobbler as soon as humanly possible.
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Roasted grape, goat cheese, and walnut tart

Roasted grape, goat cheese, and walnut tart

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The word “tart” is probably one of the most used homonyms in culinary terms. First of all, “tart” used as an adjective has to do with taste — like bitter, sour or acerbic. But today I’d like to focus on “tart” the noun. This kind of tart can come in many, many forms: sweet, savory, shortcrust based, puff pastry based, fruit-filled, custard-filled, cheesy, etc., and is usually served as either an appetizer or dessert.

The tart I’ve decided to whip up this week is a mix of sweet and savory — roasted grapes and goat cheese — on a bed of flaky puff pastry crust. It’s an easy-to-prepare, classy appetizer that’d be perfect for a fête during any season.

So why did I pick puff pastry over a short crust pie dough? Honestly, I’m a lazy baker and puff dough is as easy as grabbing from the freezer, thawing then baking. It’s also a party food lifesaver and should always be kept onhand for last-minute appetizers, main dishes accoutrements and desserts. For flavor, always choose puff dough made with butter, not vegetable shortening, as it will give you a buttery, flaky, melt-in-your-mouth product versus one with a weird aftertaste. Another cook’s tip: an egg wash (see recipe below) will give puff pastry a golden-brown kiss of color.

Try out this sweet, savory, and not too tart (the adjective) tart recipe that’s topped with roasted grapes, goat cheese, walnuts and fresh rosemary. It’s a breeze to bake up and your party guests will surely be impressed.

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Say “Opa!” to these Greek lamb sliders in pita pockets

Say “Opa!” to these Greek lamb sliders in pita pockets
Besides being utterly delectable, these Greek lamb sliders are healthy as well.

Besides being utterly delectable, these Greek lamb sliders are healthy as well.

When it comes to burgers, quality meat can make a simple burger great, but flavorful additions can really put it over the top. Herbs and spices mixed into the meat, tasty toppings, quality cheeses and fancy buns can all contribute to make one stellar gourmet burger.

Take, for example, my Greek-inspired sliders. Feta cheese and warming spices add a flavorful kick to the ground lamb, and instead of lettuce and tomato, the red wine vinegar-tossed spinach and onion serve as the topping. And forget the boring standard bun, these Greco masterpieces are sandwiched between fluffy pita bread.

Besides being utterly delectable, they’re actually pretty healthful as well. Lamb meat contains omega-3 and monounsaturated fatty acids (a.k.a.: the good fats). When grocery shopping, go for pasture-raised New Zealand lamb (or grass-fed beef) as it contains higher levels of these essential fatty acids. For a lightened version of the sliders without sacrificing any of the flavor, simply nix the Feta and the pitas, and either bake or grill them instead of pan frying.

These Greek sliders are perfect for a summer cookout party, a game night in with friends, or even a simple weeknight meal. Not into mini food? The recipe can easily make four full-sized burgers as well. Serve them alongside a Greek salad, some grilled or broiled eggplant, and pair them with a crisp, light Sauvignon Blanc from South Africa or New Zealand. Read the rest of this entry